New Branch Coming Soon!

We are pleased to announce that we will be opening a new branch in the Pittsburg Century Plaza Summer 2018. Please be informed that we will be closing the branch at 160 East 10th Street in Pittsburg effective April 16, 2018.

In the interim, please feel free to visit our branch at 1870 A Street in Antioch, or any of our other branch locations.

These necessary changes will help us in fulfilling our commitment to providing the best member service experience.

We thank you for your understanding.

If you have any questions, please contact us at 925-293-1785. read more >

Tips for Teens – Spring Email Cleaning

Bunny on laptopBack in November, I received a newsletter in my email inbox. I probably signed up to receive these emails back when I thought 0.05% off $500 dollars was a good deal, so I read and deleted it, thinking that would be it for a while. Later that same week, another newsletter from the same store came in for a different set of deals. This time, I deleted it again but was both a little annoyed and a little surprised that they had sent two emails in the same week after a six month hiatus. That next weekend, I received a third email for a different set of deals! At this point, I was fairly annoyed for two reasons: one, I remember signing up the year before for that measly discount but only for the once a month frequency and two, it made me realize just how many unopened emails I had in my inbox. On top of the junk mail, there was last week’s actual news still to be read, some satire news still needing to be laughed at, a couple of order confirmations and tracking numbers for items that I already received, and many more. read more >

President’s Corner – The Moment’s Over

After Ebby Calvin (“Nuke”) LaLoosh (played by Tim Robbins) pitched a perfect inning for the minor league Durham Bulls baseball team in 1988’s Bull Durham, he sat next to his catcher, Crash Davis (played by Kevin Costner), and they had the following conversation:

Nuke : That was great, huh?

Crash : Your fastball’s up, your curveball’s hanging. In the Show, they would’ve ripped you.

Nuke : Can’t you even let me enjoy the moment?

Crash : The moment’s over. read more >

Tax Identity Theft – Part 2

This month’s scam comes directly from the U.S. Department of the Treasury. The IRS has identified an existing scam in which cybercriminals have stolen client data from tax professionals and have filed fraudulent refunds using real taxpayer information, including bank account and routing information for direct deposit.

What is new is that the fraudster then contacts the taxpayer posing as an employee of a debt collection agency working on behalf of the IRS. They ask the taxpayer to take certain steps to return the refund, which actually goes to the criminals. read more >

Tips for Teens – College Textbooks: The Cheapskate Way

Stick man reading books with graduation hat onCollege. It’s like handing over an ounce of gold at the bookstore for a years’ worth of supplies. Seriously though, according to the College Board, the “yearly books-and-supplies in-state estimate for the average full-time undergraduate student at a four-year public college is about $1,298″* and gold is currently trading at about $1,300 per oz. Thankfully, there are some ways to minimize the impact to the point where FASFA might actually be enough!

Don’t forget to check the public library!
Let’s face it, it’s probably been a long time since you last set foot in a public library. They’re still there and they often have the books you need to check out for free! For example, suppose the books your professor asks for are George Orwell’s 1984, John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. One option would be to cough up $25 dollars for three books that realistically will never be read again and just take up room on your bookshelf. Option two is to check to see if these books are old enough to be in the public domain. Books in the public domain are free and are usually uploaded in a PDF format by a reputable source, like a .edu, .org, or 3rd party eBook distributor like the Google Play Bookstore or the Amazon Kindle store. Unlike PDFs that you find on Google after searching for The Great Gatsby Free PDF, these PDFs and legal to use, redistribute, and print since their copyright expired. The former PDFs are infringing on the books’ copyright and you might run into legal trouble if caught using one. However, the third and fail safe route is to use the public library. Just go back in, renew or apply for a library card, then go to the website to place holds on the books that are needed that semester. Just remember to return them after you’re done using them to avoid late fees. read more >

President’s Corner – Necessary Change

Jake Blues (played by John Belushi in the 1980 classic movie “The Blues Brothers”) was covered in mud after a burst of gunfire from his former fiancée (played by the late Carrie Fisher) while he was trying to explain to her why he left her at the altar.

“I ran out of gas. I got a flat tire. I didn’t have change for cab fare. I lost my tux at the cleaners. I locked my keys in the car. An old friend came in from out of town. Someone stole my car. There was an earthquake. A terrible flood! Locusts! IT WASN’T MY FAULT!…” read more >

Tax Identity Theft

Tax identity theft is still on the rise. Last year, the IRS identified 14,000 fraudulent tax returns with $900 million claimed in fraudulent refunds, according to an audit report from the U.S. Treasury Inspector for Tax Administration. The IRS uses your Social Security Number (SSN) to make sure your filing is accurate and complete, and that you get any refund you are due. Identity theft can affect how your tax return is processed. An unexpected notice or letter from the IRS could alert you that someone else is using your SSN. The IRS does not start contact with a taxpayer by sending an email, text or social media message that asks for personal or financial information. If you get an email that claims to be from the IRS, do not reply or click on any links. Instead, forward it to . read more >

Warning: Lottery Scam Using a CFPB Employee’s Name

Message from CFPB's Stacy Canan: Beward of lottery scams using my name.

I’m Stacy Canan, I lead the Office for Older Americans at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and I’m never going to call you to confirm that you have won a lottery or sweepstakes.

I just found out that my name is being used in an elaborate imposter scam. An imposter scam happens when a criminal tricks you by claiming to be someone you trust. In this case, the scammers are claiming to be me in order to take advantage of you—and steal your money.

This scam has four basic parts:

  • You receive a call notifying you that you’ve won a lottery or sweepstakes prize. Several other calls will follow.
  • One of these calls may come from an imposter claiming to be Stacy Canan, or another CFPB or U.S. government agency official who confirms that you’ve won the prize.
  • Later, you’re told that in order to collect the prize, you must pay the taxes upfront.
  • You send the money to pay the taxes and never hear from any of the callers again.

Signs of an imposter scam

Scams like the above can happen on the phone, through the mail, e-mail, or over the internet. They can occur in person, at home, or at a business. Here are some common signs:

  • You are told you won a sweepstakes or drawing that you did not enter.
  • You’re asked to pay upfront taxes or fees.
  • You’re being pressured to act now. Scammers don’t want you to take the time to do research or to think too carefully before parting with your money.
  • A person claiming to be a government official contacts you to confirm your winnings—the CFPB does not contact consumers about sweepstakes winnings.

Learn more about protecting yourself from financial scams or check the FTC’s website to stay up-to-date on the most recent types of fraud. read more >

Tips for Teens – It’s Beginning to Look Like a Bunch of Holiwaste!

Cartoon dinosaur holding a gift.The holidays have come and gone. The songs have been sung, decorations put away, food long ago eaten. Now comes the age old question, where did I put the gift receipts? It’s understandable if you need a different size or if Pantone 448C really isn’t your color, and you’re not alone. According to CNN Money, 7% of Millennials do return their holiday gifts and another 15% to 30% of all online gifts will be returned, accounting for $32 billion dollars in refunds. My point being, you probably opened that box that had the *fill in the blank* inside and decided on returning it. The store will most likely take it back, but will think twice about putting it back on the shelf. That’s because it’s often less expensive for the retailer to dispose of a good than it is to sell it again. For example, let’s say you were planning on returning that $80 Pantone 448C sweater your sweet, dear, twice-removed relative gifted you. The retailer will give you back your $80 but since it doesn’t look exactly fresh off the press, they’ll either put it back on the shelf for 75% off, bringing the price down to $20 dollars, which would be a hypothetical loss of $10 dollars, or they could use the space they would have used for the sweater to sell something more eye appealing. read more >

President’s Corner – New Tax Plan and Non-Profits

The year 2017 had no shortage of drama and debate in business, politics, or pop culture. My favorite moment last year happened at the very end of the year and was predictably sports-related. In the last game of the NFL regular season, Andy Dalton, the oft-maligned quarterback of the perennially woeful Cincinnati Bengals threw a touchdown pass to beat the Baltimore Ravens. Neither team made the playoffs, but the Bengals’ win sent the Buffalo Bills to the playoffs for the first time since 1999. read more >